Wargames – 25th Anniversary. Can you fucking believe it?

Damn, I felt old when I read this article in Wired magazine about the 25h Anniversary of the movie WarGames, one of my all time favorite 80s movies. It’s got everything I dig in a movie. First, it is at some level a teen angst movie, focusing on David Lightman (played by a 21-year-old Mathew Broderick), a teenage underachiever who is a hacker before anyone knew what a hacker really was. And, it is about the threat of nuclear war, something I worried a lot about when I was teenager. I think a lot of GenXers did. Also, at the time, I really wanted a computer, but they were so fucking expensive. I can recall mooning over an early Apple system in a computer store that was going to run me about $5,000. I tried saving up for it but it was just too much money. I always thought it was strange that even though my dad wanted me to major in computer science at the time he would not foot the bill for a computer. Of course, I understand better now that I am an adult who has to work to pay the bills. $5,000 is a lot of cash. And I had 4 other siblings. Finally, WarGames, had Ally Sheedy who is just damn cute for words in this movie.

What I really dig about this article is that tracks the evolution of the movie. From the original idea to what it eventually became, following how it changed along the way. I don’t know about other people, but I’m interested in that sort of thing. Where the idea for a movie came from? How the script came about? And how it changed over time? Fascinating stuff.

Coincidentally, a few weeks before I’d been talking about WarGames with a woman that works at the library where I also work. She and I are about the same age. And she was saying how she wanted to watch it with her kids. I’d be interested to know what Millennials and even the younger generation thinks about that movie. This colleague pointed out that we did not have a copy of the movie at our library and that she had to inter-library loan it. It also ended up being on cable for some reason about a week after that conversation. I happen to catch it, and I think that it still holds up. Something you can’t say about a lot of 80s movies. Ugh.

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